window7 upgradeIf you’re excited about upgrading to Windows 7, you’re not alone. Reactions are coming in from people who have tried the new operating system and so far, the reviews have been positive. From the new and improved UI, to enhanced features such as Live Taskbar previews, easier file sharing, wider hardware support and others, Microsoft has made the upgrade compelling for many Windows users, especially those who skipped Vista and held on to XP.

If you’re using an older computer running Windows XP, we suggest you first head over to Microsoft’s Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor. After downloading the free tool, run it to scan your PC for potential issues with your hardware, devices, and installed programs. The tool will recommend actions you should take before you upgrade. It is important to understand that upgrading from XP to Windows 7 at a minimum means a format of your hard drive and re-installation of all applications. If your PC is older then mostly likely you will have to wait until you are ready to buy a new PC.


If your PC is running Windows Vista without problems, chances are it’s ready to run Windows 7. If you bought your copy of Vista or a PC running Vista after June 26, 2009, you might be qualified for a special upgrade offer to Windows 7, so make Microsoft’s official Windows 7 Upgrade and Migration page your first stop to find out.
Once you’re ready to take the plunge, get ready to do some homework first. Just like Vista, Windows 7 comes in different editions. Weigh your options and find out which edition is right for you. Also, PC World has put together a nice article on the five things you should know before upgrading to Windows 7 from XP. For a more detailed guide, visit Engadget blog’s excellent post on how to install Windows 7 and live to tell about it.

If you find the process too complicated, don’t have the time, or if you’re thinking of upgrading many computers, why not contact us? We can help you sort out your options and ensure a smooth upgrade.

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Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.